The Money Belt?

Asset allocation, risk, diversification and rebalancing. Pros/cons of hiring a financial advisor.

The Money Belt?

Postby flywaysuzy » 23 Aug 2011 09:49

In searching for materials specifically designed to teach young adults a bit of financial literacy, I came across a web site from the gov't of canada offering exactly that. Too bad the server seems unable to processs requests for materials...

http://www.themoneybelt.ca/home-accueil-eng.asp

Anybody ever run one of these workshops or know anything about the materials?
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby flywaysuzy » 24 Aug 2011 11:11

The English part of the money belt website is gibbled, but the lady called this morning and the materials are in-will report
back when they've arrived!
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby Taggart » 24 Aug 2011 11:58

flywaysuzy:

Did you happen to read this column in yesterday's Globe:

Two lessons on the road to becoming wealthy

Andrew Hallam is a Canadian who teaches English and personal finance at Singapore American School. He is the author of Millionaire Teacher: The nine rules of wealth you should have learned in school. This is the first in a series of columns based on his book.

------------------------------------------

For people of all ages, I also highly recommend the The Richest Man In Babylon
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby Nemo2 » 24 Aug 2011 12:40

Taggart wrote:Andrew Hallam is a Canadian who teaches English and personal finance at Singapore American School.

While his financial advice is basic & valid I can't help but shudder at an English teacher writing "Like I said". :shock:
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby Taggart » 24 Aug 2011 12:56

Nemo2 wrote:
Taggart wrote:Andrew Hallam is a Canadian who teaches English and personal finance at Singapore American School.

While his financial advice is basic & valid I can't help but shudder at an English teacher writing "Like I said". :shock:


New generation Nemo. As for myself, I'm just an old fogey who has to accept the change.
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby flywaysuzy » 24 Aug 2011 23:11

Thanks for that Taggart, please send the rest along when it's printed! One dear offspring is coming back home to roost. No financial assets, just a tv bigger than a cow-to be honest at his age I don't think I had many assets either, just 5 years of university under my belt. At least I didn't have a tv requiring a hangar to put it in :)
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby CROCKD » 06 Nov 2011 17:56

flywaysuzy wrote:In searching for materials specifically designed to teach young adults a bit of financial literacy


From homeless to home owner

I found this article interesting from a couple of aspects.

First - the teaching of financial literacy.

Second - the role of an organization which developed from the Mennonite Central Committee of Alberta. The Mennonites have frequently been mentioned in this forum as a charity worth supporting.

Thirdly - how an individual given a leg up and support can help themself.
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby CROCKD » 08 Nov 2011 17:03

A financially challenged generation is slipping through the cracks

A survey from British Columbia Securities Commission found that at a time when personal debt levels and housing prices are soaring to record highs, recent high-school grads are nothing but optimistic about their financial future.

The survey of more than 3,000 17-to-20-year olds, released last week to kick off Financial Literacy Month, found that the average respondent expects to be raking in about $90,000 a year by the age of 30. That is roughly three times the national average.

Almost three-quarters of those surveyed think that they will be homeowners by the same age, despite government data estimating that only 42 per cent of 25-to-29-year olds are homeowners.
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Re: The Money Belt?

Postby AltaRed » 08 Nov 2011 17:33

I don't know about that.
1) It could be typical of a generation that has been coddled and supported by mommy and daddy for the most part, have been taught self-esteem all through school despite an inability to read or write, and rescued from hurting themselves every time they get a bump on the head. Why not expect the moon?
2) OTOH, development of self-esteem will allow them to push through obstacles and perhaps feel confident enough they will have the skills to succeed. Why not be optimistic?

It may depend on which one of those people show up when the rubber hits the road.
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